Cancer Research

Ionic Minerals for Cancer

Our bodies need a wide range of micronutrients which we normally obtain from foods in our diet. A theory suggests that particular micronutrient minerals in a bioavailable ionic form will target cancer at the cellular level.
Cancer and other diseased cells often follow an anaerobic metabolic cycle which is less restrictive about micronutrient intake than normal healthy cells. When presented with certain metal ions, John Wayne Kennedy believed that greedy cancer cells take in excessive amounts to the point of metal toxicity and then perish. He theorizes that normal cells which follow the more sophisticated Krebs cycle will absorb only those micronutrient ions that they need and expel the excess.

Kennedy’s first drug candidate utilizes an aqueous mixture of zinc and copper ions, formulated into a cream for topical tests. Remarkably, anecdotal reports of non-clinical testing suggested high efficacy and safety against basal and squamous skin cancers. Suggesting systemic effects, positive results were also reported from topical tests on internal tumors when the cream was applied in the region. Other methods of administration, such as injectables and transdermal patches, could potentially be developed to better deliver this technology to specific locations.
If this theory is proven, this technology may have applications in cancer treatment therapies, detecting small tumors, and preventing tumors by selectively killing cancer cells before tumors form.

An additional area of study is whether these ionic elements act to help the body scavenge free-radicals and reduce oxidative stress, a process known to help prevent and fight cancer formation and proliferation and to help fight aging. Zinc and copper are also important for human proteins that both influence disease defense pathways and upregulate antioxidant enzymes.

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